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March 2010 - Erica Halverson

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Cheryl Diermyer's picture

Feburary 2010 - "I'll Never Turn to the Dark Side"

"I’ll never turn to the dark side” - Essential Storytelling Elements for Instructional Media

Mike Kern is a performance learning specialist/curriculum designer at American Family Insurance. Previously, he was an interactive media specialist for Wisconsin Public Broadcasting.  He has an M.S. Ed in educational technology from UW-Madison and recently won the 2009 scriptwriting award from the Madison chapter of Media Communications Association International (MCAI). The next discussion is scheduled for Wednesday, February 24, 12:00 -1:00, at the School of Education, Teacher Ed building, room 220, MERIT library. Mike invites us to experience his research into what elements of storytelling learners found most helpful.

Mike participating in the NASA Tweetup where his storytelling about the shuttle launch was limited to 140 characters at a time."]

"I’ll never turn to the dark side” - Essential Storytelling Elements for Instructional Media

Mike Kern is a performance learning specialist/curriculum designer at American Family Insurance. Previously, he was an interactive media specialist for Wisconsin Public Broadcasting.  He has an M.S. Ed in educational technology from UW-Madison and recently won the 2009 scriptwriting award from the Madison chapter of Media Communications Association International (MCAI). The next discussion is scheduled for Wednesday, February 24, 12:00 -1:00, at the School of Education, Teacher Ed building, room 220, MERIT library. Mike invites us to experience his research into what elements of storytelling learners found most helpful. Like them, we’ll view scenarios as if preparing to explore relational issues more deeply.  We’ll try to predict outcomes, see what affects us as learners, and then discover what had the greatest impact on a variety of learners. Nearly 90 aspects of storytelling were identified for this qualitative research project. Viewing different styles of presenting stories using media, learners identified what it was about the stories that most engaged them and helped them begin to apply what they learned.  Lessons learned will be most useful to those working in the social sciences or providing soft skills training. NOTES from the session: "I'll never turn to the dark side!" Essential storytelling elements for instructional media. Mike Kern Stories have power, can resonate and carry through. This is why the line "I'll never turn to the dark side!" has meaning. What kinds of stories help people learn? This has been Mike's work and research area. What is important? (Brainstorm predictions of what's important) - identifying w/ one or more of the characters - visualize, imagine, see themselves in it. - setting - a problem or problems to solve - emotion - engaging Mike presented participants with story clips to respond to. We got to watch them, too. Our responses: - there was enough of a storyline that we were interested in what happens next - wanted to know who the people were - there was a sense of a drama - there's "good vs. evil" - there's a problem to be solved. - scenario seemed common - change in workplace - lack of context raises different kinds of questions. - there's a lot that's unspoken - there is fear, palpable paranoia Mike then presented respondents with a second story clip. We got to watch them, too. Our responses: - good acting helps. - sense of conflict - fear - characters create clear sense of good and evil - varied responses to captain's character - dealing with stereotypical military responses vs. "human" side - you don't need to hear the words to understand the message - body language, tone of voice - it's asking who/what I believe - could be race issues involved in the conflict The storytelling elements that participants in the study found most helpful - For the research findings, see the handout. What are the differences with instructional videos vs. mainstream videos? - production quality - using the powerful tools of story and staging to make max impact - where does the deep/critical learning take place? "We devote an enormous amount of pedagogical effort to teaching the methods of science and rational thought... yet we live most of our lives in a world constructed according to the rules and devices of narrative." - Jerome Bruner, The Culture of Education Download the presentation: MKstorytelling-0210

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Chris Blakesley's picture

November 2009 - Recap

Learning Through Story: Reflections & Looking Ahead

Narrative pedagogy. Stories and game design. Working memory.

waglerm DanNorton postle November 5, 2009 Agenda
  • Roundtable discussion: What brings you here?
  • What past topics have been of particular interest?
  • How can sessions next semester inform your work?
To prepare, please take a minute to review notes from sessions that interested you: Whether you’ve attended all or none, this will be a good chance to catch up on the conversation growing on campus about the intersection between stories and learning. We hope to see you there.
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Ron Cramer's picture

The Struggles of Service Learning

An article from this morning's Inside HigherEd highlights recent work done on service learning by some folks here at the UW and Edgewood:

In The Unheard Voices: Community Organizations and Service Learning(Temple University Press), Randy Stoecker, professor of community and environmental sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Elizabeth Tryon, community partner specialist for the Human Issues Studies Program at Edgewood College’s School of Integrative Studies, explore the relationship between college and community, asking whether the latter benefits as much as service-learning proponents say.



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Cheryl Diermyer's picture

Event Planning

Monthly Session Checklist

  1. Find speaker/plan event.
  2. Set date and time.
  3. Create page on wiki. Update front page wiki with event blurb.
  4. Ensure email invite is sent out 1 month-2 weeks in advance to email list below.
  5. Send out Reminder email to list above, 1 week-1 day before event.
  6. (Optional) After session, post notes to blog, and send follow-up email to list above.
  7. Send a thank you email to the session guest leader
Email List:
  • Comets
  • GLS
  • AT
  • Teaching Academy
  • LTS Group List (send email to self, and put group members' email in "BCC" box)

Structure of Session

5 minutes - welcome 20 minutes - Topic Introduction (Guest Leader) 25 minutes - discussion, activity, sharing (Guest leader and event coordinator guides the discussion) 10 minutes for participants to connect and make closing comments/announcements.

Invitation eMail Example

Hello Learning Through Story participants, We are pleased to begin the 2010 fall semester of Learning Through Story (LTS) discussions. The LTS group continues to meet and discuss issues and practices related to the research and use of stories and narratives in higher education. Cultural Landscape Tour Thursday, September 23, Noon-1:00 Meet in front of Memorial Union Aaron Bird Bear will lead us on this walking tour and demonstrate how place-based learning can enrich teaching and engage students with course content. Join us in hearing and participating in the stories of the parallel developments of the state and university with consideration of the complex outcomes for American Indian people and nations of the Great Lakes. The evolving relationship between Indians and non-Indians can be seen in the development of campus buildings and landmarks over time. October Session To be Determined Collecting the Sounds and Images of Oral Traditions Thursday, November 18, Noon - 1:00 Teacher Education building Dr.Scheub is the Evjue-Bascom Professor of Humanities in the Department of African Languages and Literature and one of the world's leading scholars in African oral traditions and folklore. To record oral traditions he has walked more than 6000 miles through South Africa, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, and Lesotho. His course, The African Storyteller, is one of the most popular classes on the UW campus - regularly enrolling 500 students. Join LTS in a discussion with Harold on the collection of images and sounds and  the role of storytelling and narrative in the classroom as it relates to teaching and learning. We meet at Teacher Education building, 225 N. Mills Street room 220. Feel free to bring your lunch. To learn more about the upcoming discussion, visit the Learning Through Story blog at http://learningthroughstory.wordpress.com/.  Notes from previous discussions are posted. Also, your comments to the blog are welcome. Cheryl Diermyer, Academic Technology, LTDE Catherine Stephens, School of Education, MERIT Chris Blakesley, Academic Technology, ENGAGE If you prefer not to receive email reminders for up coming LTS discussions please respond to this email indicating such.

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Reminder eMail example

Hello Everyone, This is a friendly reminder of our the upcoming Learning Through Story forum scheduled on Tuesday, September 29, from Noon-1:00PM, Noon -1:00, room 220, Teacher Education building, 225 N. Mills Street . Please join us as we meet with Brad Postle, Psychology and Psychiatry.  Bard will lead a discussion on the working memory and how it interfaces with cognitive function and retention of content.   As a group we will discuss the role of working memory in the design and use of narrative/story in the curriculum.  Feel free to bring your lunch. You can visit the Learning Through Story blog at http://learningthroughstory.wordpress.com/.  Notes from discussions are posted. New contributions to the blog are welcome. Cheryl Diermyer, DoIT – Academic Technology Catherine Stephens, School of Education, MERIT Chris Blakesley, Academic Technology, ENGAGE

Thank you eMail example

Feel free to draft one.

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Possible speakers include:

September .. let's try to get Richard Davidson (July) David Simkins from GLS expressed interest in offering a session. October .. M. Streibel November .. open discussion or Jim Matthews
  • Michael Streibel, School of Ed, Ed Tech department Use of imagery and story Michael said he would like to lead a session in the Fall (not summer).
  • Jim Matthews – also said he would be willing to lead a session.
  • Richard Davidson - Cheryl is in contact with Richard
  • Alex Shackman, Ph.D. Waisman Research Center (emotions and memory), 608-263-3672, shackman@wisc.edu
  • Kirin Narayan, Anthropology Department http://www.anthropology.wisc.edu/people_narayan.php Use of story for teaching and learning.
  • Mary Louise Gomez, School of Ed faculty, C&I, Use of story in teaching and learning, Catherine contacted Mary about possibly presenting in July…no reply.
  • James Gustafson, School of Medicine / Psychiatry. Use of narrative with therapy.   Tell him Mark Wagler recommended him..
  • “Narrative Pedagogy” used in Nursing School as part of patient care practice. Find out who could speak about topic.
  • Kirin Narayan, Anthropology Department, http://www.anthropology.wisc.edu/people_narayan.php, Use of story for teaching and learning.
  • Joel Levine – Ed Psych, Retired faculty, Study in use of narrative images and learning.  “Prose learning”.
  • Mary Louise Gomez, School of Ed faculty, C&I, Use of story in teaching and learning

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Current Roster

NAME DEPARTMENT COMMENTS
1 Michael Streibel Curriculum and Instruction, Education
2 Ruth Olson Folklore
3 Margaret Nellis Human Ecology and Health, SoECounseling Psychology I'm interested!  Especially:Place-based LearningStory as a communication strategy
4 Mark Wagler CoLab Thanks for the invitation! I plan to attend. I'm particularly interested in the these topics:* Oral storytelling (documenting and studying contemporary oral narratives)* Narrative-based curriculum & instruction (using ideas from many sources, including Jerome Bruner's "Two Modes of Thought" essay and Walter Ong's Orality and Literacy)* Place-based learning* Narrative and games
5 Caton Roberts Psychology (FIGS)
6 Mingfong Jan Education
7 Ryan Martinez Education
8 Jeff Henriques Psychology, jhenriqu@wisc.edu
9 Mary Ellen Murray SON
10 David Gagnon AT
11 Kevin Harris AT Will attend. I'm interested in the following:* Story and cognition* Narrative and games* Interactive Narratives* Place-based Learning * Assessing learning through stories
12 Chris Lupton AT
13 Jon McKenzie English Will attend
14 Carole Turner AT
15 Mary Louise Gomez SoE
16 Erica Laughlin ITA
17 Patrick Simms Theater and Drama
18 Harold Scheub L&S, African Languages & Lit
19 Margot Kennard Student Services
20 Shiela Reaves CALS, Communication I am truly heartbroken that I cannot attend -- I am driving my son back to University of Missouri so there is no possible way. PLEASE, PLEASE keep me on your list. I recently used digital storytelling of Joe Lambert for my documentary photography class and the students responded very, very well.
21 Gerardo Mancilla Education, College Access
22 Roberta Hill English
23 Joseph Ewoodzie L&S, Afro-American Studies
24 Carl Grant WCER, SoE,CHECK MISSPELLING in email address (edcuation) before sending Thanks for the invite, but I will be in Istanbul. Note: email in the wisc directory is wrong - pls check before sending.
25 Barb Smith MERIT
26 Gloria Ladson-Billings SoE
27 Simone Schweber SoE, Humanities I'm sorry, but I'm going to be out of town that day. Otherwise, I'd be interested in coming.
28 Diana Hess SoE
29 Lisa Hoon SoE Will Attend. I am sooo interested in this topic for use with my students. i'd like to have my summer uw students use this to frame their disability interview for publication
30 Katy Swalwell SoE, Continueing Ed
31 Seann Dikkers Curriculum & Instruction
32 Robert Enright SoE, Human Ecology
33 Alan Knox SoE, School of Med/Public Heath Regret that I Will be away then
34 Sara Goldrick-Rab SoE
35 Laurie Clark SoE
36 John Martin regardingjohn@gmail.comSoE? I'll be in New York presenting at Games for Change on narrative and place-based games for learning that day. However, I'd very much like to hear about the discussion and would be interested in meeting at the next one!
37 Les Howles Academic Technology Will be out of town. But keep me informed.
38 David “Jasun” Carr L&S, Computer Sciences
39 Tim  Cartwright tcartwright@wisc.edu
40 George Roesch Johnson gjohnson@epd.engr.wisc.eduAssociate FacultyEPD - Engineering Professional Development, Technical Communication Program Ruth Olson forwarded me the notice about the meeting. I plan on being there and am interested in all the topics on the list.George is teaching Tues & Thurs. Fall 09
41 Jim Mathews jmmathew@wisc.edu Jim is a doctoral student in Educational Communications and Technology, works in our Local Games Lab, and uses storytelling in his teaching. (From Mark Wagler)
42 Aaron Bird Bear abirdbear@wisc.edu SoE grad, and PA in the Dean's office.
43. Lindsey Schmidt, Lindseyj.Schmidt@doit.wisc.edu 44. Chris Lupton, clupton@wisc.edu 45. Teri Balser, tcbalser@wisc.edu 46. Mike Kern, Senior Curriculum Development Designer, American Insurance, mker1@amfam.com, 608-249-2111. Could share research on what elements of storytelling learners found most helpful when used in instructional media. 47. Bill (William) Bland, Soil Sciences, wlbland@wisc.edu 48. Brad Postle, postle@wisc.edu 49. Dan Norton, Filament Games, norton@filamentgames.com 50. Erica Halverson (erhalverson@education.wisc.edu) 51. Michael Sullivan, mtsullivan@wisc.edu 52. BASSAM Z SHAKHASHIRI, (608) 262-0538, bassam@chem.wisc.edu
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